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MADE IN GHANA

 

 

 

NUTRITION

Nutrition is sturdily and rapidly becoming the foremost determinant of health in today’s Sars-Cov-2 and climate change ravaged world.

While safe food sustains life, contamination obliterates its values and could result in death and short to long term morbidity.

 

FOOD SAFETY RISKS

The most common food safety risks of public health concern are: i) micro-organisms (E. coli/faecal coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp, Bacillus cereus, and Viral hepatitis); ii) drugs (Amoxicillin, Chlortetracycline, Ciprofloxacin, Danofloxacin, and Doxycycline) and; iii) chemicals (Chlorpyrifos).

Salad, vegetables, sliced mango, meat pie, and snail khebab are of high public health risks.

Highly contaminated food results in death, short to long term morbidity, economic loss, and threatens to displace Ghana’s efforts at achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

 

HACCP

Hazard analysis and critical control points, or HACCP is a systematic preventive approach to food safety from biological, chemical, and physical hazards in production processes that can cause the finished product to be unsafe and designs measures to reduce these risks to a safe level.

HACCP is focused only on the health safety issues of a product and not the quality of the product, yet HACCP principles are the basis of most food quality and safety assurance systems.

 

ORGANIC FARMING

 

Organic farming, also known as ecological farming or biological farming is an agricultural system that uses fertilizers of organic origin such as compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and places emphasis on techniques such as crop rotation and companion planting.

It originated early in the 20th century in reaction to rapidly changing farming practices. Certified organic agriculture accounts for 70 million hectares (170 million acres) globally, with over half of that total in Australia.

Biological pest control, mixed cropping, and the fostering of insect predators are encouraged. Organic standards are designed to allow the use of naturally-occurring substances while prohibiting or strictly limiting synthetic substances.For instance, naturally-occurring pesticides such as pyrethrin are permitted, while synthetic fertilizer and pesticides are generally prohibited. Synthetic substances that are allowed include, for example, copper sulfate, elemental sulfur, and veterinary drugs. Genetically modified organisms, nanomaterials, human sewage sludge, plant growth regulators, hormones, and antibiotic use in livestock husbandry are prohibited.

 

 

ORGANIC FOOD

 

Jozy Snacks                   Dried fruits Cereals        Josephine Oduro Boateng

Spintexroad          (behind Manet Gardens)

jozysnacks.worldpress.com

+233243937996

 

Hendy Farms                 Marmalade Jam              Sandra Snowden,Emida Ferguson

www.hendyfarmsgh.com

+233500554130

 

Café Magnifico              Café Products                     Ivy Wereh

sales@cafemagnifico.com

+233208780888

 

 

OSIRU FARM                                                                 Frederick Teye

D’Organikan FOODS      Pineapple winery

dorganikanfoods@gmail.com

Insta  @dorganikan_foods

0554383822

 

 

SAVANNAH FLAVOR NATURAL & ORGANIC FOODS

Kasava Flour                  Free of Glutene
Coconut Chips

ADD: GE 289-5217 Taifa, Accra

026 426 7401

0558799630

 

RAANAN FISH FEED WEST AFRICA LTD.                Jacques Magnee

Prampram Dawhenya Road

P.M.B. 146 GPO Accra-Central

+233 241435600

Jacques@raananfishfeed-wa.com

 

 

ORGANIC HEALTH PRODUCTS

 

BEAUTY AND SKIN CARE PRODUCTS

 

Bubune AFRICA

Sustainable Shea Solutions    Victoria Afua Agbai

4, Paradise Street, Asylum Down

www.bubuneafrica.com

Victoria@bubuneafrica.com

+233 241881193

 

Soul & Beauty by Faith

Ruth Brako

Faith Bookshop, St. James, Osu

0201166650

0558336612

soulandbeautybyfaith@gmali.com

IG  @soulandbeautybyfaith

 

ELE AGBE CO.LTD

Shea Butter Cosmetics
Beads Jewellery
Accessoires

Comfort Akorfa Adjahoe-Jennings

+233 244152263

+233 264152263

+233 249 440 791

eleagbe.sheashop@gmail.com

www.eleagbe.com

 

 

 

 

BIO GHANA NETWORK

Bio Ghana Network was established in 2010.
–  Operational in 2012 Headed by coordinator Samuel Quarcoo.
–  Network for companies and producers who are or want to be organically certified.
– The Network is under the Ecological Organic Agricultural Platform-Ghana (EOAP-G).

What they do

  • establishing relationships with all organic producers and companies members: producers; processors; marketers in training in and quality assurance to collaborate with experienced stakeholders.
  • Encourage members to be organically certified.
  • Find market avenues for both local and international, export organic fresh and dried fruits, vegetables and peels, processed cocoa and its derivatives.
  • Organize trips for international organic conferences and fairs (like Biofach).
  • Connect to all internationally recognized organic establishments like IFOAM.
  • Bring together all organic exporters/importers in Ghana, advocate interests of members and support companies to get certified looking for sponsors.
  • Well coordinated activities and a single website to capture operations and information sharing.
  • Harmonize funding and arrange inflows to support all companies involved in organic activities to reduce costs by doing things together.
  • Revamping the sector with expertise.

 

https://bioghana.net/

 

FAIR TRADE GHANA NETWORK

FTGN is membership-based organization championing sustainable agriculture and handicraft production in the fair trade environment in Ghana.

It is a national network of fair trade certifed farmers, handicraft producers and hired labour organisations. The network focuses on programmes in the following areas for the benefit of its members:

Capacity Building
FTGN seeks to build the capacity of its members in entrepreneurship, development of business models, marketing, technology, organic farming, climate change etc. These will be facilitated through training courses, seminars and workshops leading to the gradual, positive and sustainable transformation to member’s operations and livelihood and fair trade in general.

Policy and Advocacy
FTGN engages in producer driven policy formulation and advocacy actions to amplify the producers’ voice on issues affecting their activities and trading fairly. Members will benefit from advocacy trainings to develop and build on their skills in this area to enable them influence policies and challenges in their various sectors.

Partnerships
The network seeks to develop strategic partnerships, affiliations and alliances with both international and national institutions to support the objectives of the organisations in order to achieve its goals.

Market development and access
FTGN seeks to engage in the development of a strategy together with other relevant stakeholders to begin trading in fair trade certified products in Ghana. It is the network’s expectation that this will create market access locally for its members.

 

Fog Avenue, Westland Boulevard – Opposite Shell Filling station on the West Legon Road
Ghana Post GPS - GA5525421

Contact No.
059 545 3005
info@FairTradeGhanaNetwork.org

https://www.fairtradeghananetwork.org/